Electricians

Important Things To Look For In An Electrical Panel Upgrades

What is a Panel Heater?

A panel heater is a type of electric heater that you can mount on the wall. You can put panel heaters anywhere you like, as long as there is a 30cm clearance at the top and bottom of the panel to allow for the convection current and a nearby power socket. As panel heaters are usually IP22 waterproof, you can also use them in the kitchen and bathroom with complete confidence.

Panel heaters are a popular choice due to their slim design and fast acting heat. They work particularly well in smaller spaces or spaces you use infrequently as they provide instant heat as soon as they are switched on meaning that you don’t have to wait around before you can comfortably use the room.

 

How the panel heater works – Natural convection technology

Econo-Heat wall panel heaters offer out-of-the-way wall mounting and are an economic way of providing efficient room heating at a low cost. Using natural convection technology, heat is mainly generated behind the heater in the space between the panel and the wall, which leads to an efficient up draught of heated air circulated into the room (the heated air rises at a speed of 0.7m per second!). This principle of convection means that about 90% of the heat comes from the back of the panel, while only 10% is radiated from the front of the panel. This form of background heating is extremely economical, safe and efficient.

Your Econo-Heat wall panel heater is designed as an alternative to conventional bar heaters and other forms of high output heaters that use large amounts of electricity. It operates at relatively low surface temperatures (75 – 90°C, dependent on the ambient temperature), and uses minimal electricity.

 

Benefits of Electric Heating

Electric is the fuel of the future for heating requirements. With volatile oil prices and supplies, less and less natural gas and more renewable electricity production, heating your home with an electric heating system will future proof your property Dwindling supplies of north sea gas, the uncertainty of imported gas supplies, the volatility of oil prices and the commitment to reduce the U.K. carbon footprint all point towards electricity as the fuel of the future. The government has set a clear path towards a lower carbon future, with electricity to be generated by nuclear power and sustainable sources e.g. wind power, solar energy, wave power etc. Electric heating is 100% efficient and carbon neutral at the point of use, and with electricity being generated by nuclear and renewable sources in the future it will become completely carbon neutral. The government also promotes the use of micro generation technologies e.g solar panels, photovoltaic’s and wind turbines. Electric heating appliances are compatible with all these micro generation technologies. As more low carbon and renewable sources of electricity become available we will increasingly see electric heating being favoured over gas.

Low Installation Costs

Electric heating is very easy to install. There is no requirement for unsightly pipe work, and minimal disruption during installation. Because each electric radiator can work independently, it is easy to add to a system as necessary or as budgets permit. Also because each radiator is controlled independently from the system, it allows much better control over room temperatures and energy usage than is possible with a boiler based system.

LOW OWNERSHIP COSTS

The true ownership costs of a heating system should be looked at over a system lifetime. Electric heating systems have no moving parts and can be expected to last over 15 years. The boiler industry quotes a lifetime of 10 years for a boiler. Boiler based systems require costly yearly maintenance whereas electric systems are maintenance free. Electric heating is 100% efficient at the point of use meaning all the fuel used is turned into heat unlike boiler systems where energy is wasted through the flue. No Maintenance and no annual inspection. Yearly maintenance and safety checks can add significant costs to the running of a system. Gas boiler systems require yearly maintenance and if used within rental properties, both private and social housing landlords are responsible for annual safety inspections. This can also be a major hassle for landlords needing to gain access to properties to conduct maintenance and safety checks. Electric heating does not require any maintenance or safety inspections.

 

What does this mean?

Put simply the cost of buying your gas powered boiler is more than an electric heating system. So is the cost of servicing, maintenance and potential repairs. In addition, the electric heater should last 50% longer than the gas boiler! Put together, this figure will almost always cancel out the fact that gas is cheaper than electricity; electric heating is a better solution over the long term for your wallet!

 

Meet the Modern Electric Heater

The electric heater has evolved over the last few years. They now have sophisticated and ultra reliable thermostatic controls. These can ensure that your room temperature is kept constant whilst activating the heater only when needed. It is much easier and cheaper to keep a room warm then to let it cool and reheat it!

The array of options can be decided by you at the time of purchase. Heaters can have a plug-in control module, or they can be supplied with every imaginable feature built in. You can even control all your heaters from one programmer and link them to a smart system; enabling heating control away from home!

It is also important to consider then fact that electric heaters are generally safer. A gas or other fuel burning system will produce carbon monoxide; which is deadly and must be removed from the home. This is not an issue for the electric heater.

Indeed, if a radiator bursts or the boiler breaks it is highly likely that your heating system will be shut off. But, if one electric heater breaks; the rest will still function perfectly. There really is much more to electric heating than meets the eye!

A Commercial Electrical Remodel Serves All Types Of Businesses

Tips for Choosing the Best Electrical Contractor for Your Business

Whether you need to retrofit an area of your business or remodel your entire building, choosing the right electrical contractor is one of the most important decisions you make to determine the success of the project. Commercial electric work requires an electrician with experience and skill working on large scale projects at businesses such as yours.

Gather Recommendations from your Network

Work your network to get good recommendations from family, friends and other business owners. Specifically, ask about the scope of their projects and whether they were satisfied with the finished job. You can also consult with local hardware and electrical supply stores, which often have a short list of professionals they recommend to their customers.

Verify Licensing and Insurance

Going with the lowest bid on your project might save some money in the short term, but you need to make sure that the commercial electrician you choose has the appropriate licensing and insurance for the work you need completed. A licensed electrician by law must carry worker’s compensation and liability insurance for accidents and injuries that might occur at your business. Hiring someone that only carries the minimum is opening yourself to risk, so never be afraid to ask a company for a copy of their insurance certificates. This is very common and they should have this information readily available. Note that bonded electricians have insurance that covers you if your electrician abandons the project and disappears.

Assess Credentials and Training

When you interview each electrician, you should evaluate their experience and capability, based on their past work. You should also find out if each electrician has the proper license. The highest license in Florida is the Unlimited Electrical Contractor license, which means the company is qualified to do anything electrical. There are various other licenses for specialties like fire alarm, low voltage, etc. Besides the company being state licensed, individual electricians can be licensed as either Master or Journeyman electrician by their local county. If they are a “card-carrying” electrician, they will at least have passed a basic test on code requirements.

Check Reviews and References

References still mean something in an increasingly digital world. So, find out as much as you can about the kind of jobs the commercial electrician has done. Then, ask for and call prior clients to assess their satisfaction with the work done. If you can, ask the electrical contractor to provide the contact information of recent clients for the same work being done on your home. Though it’s time-consuming to do this for each company you evaluate, make sure to follow through on the top three to five picks.

 

Expert Guide to Commercial Remodeling

Taking on a Commercial Construction Project

Commercial building remodeling is a big undertaking for any property owner. It’s so big that many will only go through a major remodel once or twice in their lifetime. When the remodel begins, many property owners don’t know what to expect. Being informed can help make a remodel or upgrade less stressful and more worthwhile. Doing research and working with top commercial general contractors is important.

Commercial building remodeling helps businesses stay relevant and functional. Buildings deteriorate quickly when they’re not maintained. As fixtures become inefficient and break down, repairs become critical. Buildings that do not get the maintenance they need when they need it may someday become too difficult or expensive to repair

Shut Down or No?

Business may not have to stop while the remodel takes place. Contractors can work in shifts before or after customers arrive, on weekends when the business is closed, or behind curtains, while business is conducted as normal.

Improved Use of Space

It’s important for businesses to optimize their use of space. Installation of custom cabinetry, reshaping or redesign of an attic or storage area, and even redesign of offices and cubicles are ways that a commercial renovation project can free up space in the office.

Cosmetic Improvements

Cosmetic improvements should be performed on a regular basis to prevent a building from looking dated or poorly maintained.

 

Tips from Lightning Mobile Electric

Whether you’re remodeling your entire business building, or simply doing a lighting retrofit, finding the right electrical contractor is one of the most important things you need to do for the success and safety of your establishment. Commercial electrical work is a little different from its domestic or residential variants. The former requires specific skills, experience, equipment, and tools, among other things. Hiring a professional contractor like Lightning Mobile Electric can make your life easier and save you money

Get Recommendations

As a business owner, you typically work with different companies and deal with different people on a regular basis. Use your network and ask around for any recommendations. Ask your family and friends, or other business owners. Make sure you inquire about the scope of their projects and their customers. Were they satisfied when the job was finished? You can also visit your local electrical supply and hardware stores and ask about their opinions on different contractors in your area. There’s a good chance they have a short list of professionals that they regularly recommend to their customers. Many electrical contractors in Denver, for example, are well-known in their local electrical supply stores in Colorado.

Ask About their Experience with Commercial Projects

Commercial electrical projects are different from residential ones. Obviously, you don’t want to risk your business establishment’s electrical system being installed by poorly trained and inexperienced electricians. Ask about the experience of the contractor’s workers with regards to commercial projects. Make sure they can provide you with workers who have all the knowledge, skills, and tools to do the job

Ask About their Guarantees and Warranties

A good company will stand behind their work, and will go above and beyond to provide you with the best service possible. Thus, choose those companies who take pride in their service. One great way to do this is to ask about their guarantees and warranties.

Ask for Their Estimates

You may have heard the horror stories of electricians demanding more money through excess charges, drawn out timeframes, and unexpected costs. Nothing scares business owners off more quickly than hidden fees. These things can affect your budget and the finances of your business. A good contractor will never do that. Thus, make sure you broach this subject with your contractor

 

Improving the Speed of Commercial Electrical Installations

Tough commercial installations

Commercial electrical installations are a tough job by any standard. As an electrician, you have to pay extreme attention to detail (locations of convenience sockets, lamp types, signal systems, etc.), while also having a broad overview of the electrical system of the building as a whole. Residential installation may seem like child’s play in comparison.

Speed through factors

The factors that affect large commercial electrical installation include busways, wiring, raceways and conductors. Each can be optimized to provide some time savings. From the use of I-line busways to EMT raceways, here are a few ways to improve the speed of commercial electrical installation.

Type of busway

Using an I-line busway over cable and conduit can boost your speed. The busway is one of the most important parts of any commercial electrical installation.Electricity is passed through a conductor, which is typically copper wire. The copper is not allowed to touch anything, or else it may lose the current. That is why conductors come with some kind of cover or sheath. Together, they make a wire.Many wires can be bundled together with a single sheath to deliver more electricity. This is called a power cable. In lieu of a power cable, many electrical installations use a busway or bus duct.The busway is a series of sheet metal ducts used to carry large amounts of current. The I-line busway is noted for having among the easiest installations, which is why it is a good choice if you want to speed things up.

Wiring method

Due to the plethora of regulations that exist in regard to wiring, this is actually a factor over which electricians will have little control. Regulations exist partly because of the sensitivity of wiring materials to degradation by heat, moisture and age. Even a light commercial installation may see several wiring changes a year. Facilities that handle special chemicals may be even more restricted by their wiring methods. Regardless of your wiring method, you will find that preparation, staging and proper organization techniques will increase the speed of installation. These include straightening the cable out first, so it’s easier to slip through holes, neatly packing electrical boxes and making snagless fish tape connections.

Type of raceway

The raceway is the part of the electrical system that protects the cables from the elements. It is basically an enclosed metal box in which the cables are placed, protecting them from heat, humidity, corrosion, etc.If the raceway is well grounded, it can also serve to deflect radio frequencies. In some occasions, plastic is used instead of metal, but only in cases where the cables have their own RF-shielding, as plastic does not provide this.There are many kinds of raceways, but one of the easiest and quickest to install is electrical metal tubing. Made from galvanized steel or aluminum, EMT is lightweight and easy to bend, cut and ream.

 

MAKING THE JUMP FROM RESIDENTIAL TO COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

if you are a residential contractor, you likely spend considerable downtime contemplating ways to increase company revenues. But, aside from improving efficiency, greater revenues are often realized only by way of greater sales, and additional work can prove hard to come by in an already competitive local market. So where does one go for new opportunities? Well, instead of laboring to wring every last drop out of your current residential market, maybe it’s time to expand the market itself. Maybe it’s time to look into commercial construction.

NEW HORIZONS?

But I know what you’re feeling—apprehension, uneasiness, and that’s understandable. To those not yet indoctrinated, commercial construction (CC) can appear daunting. Suddenly there are architects, engineers, liquidated damages, bonding, and a cast of wealthy business clients with short attention spans and scary-sounding law firms on speed-dial. There are new regulations, strict protocols, and new competition. “I wouldn’t know where to begin,” you tell yourself.

FINDING COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION WORK: REPORTING SERVICES

As a residential contractor, new work likely came via local advertising, your website, personal referrals, and industry contacts (i.e., real estate brokers, material suppliers). These are still great strategies for acquiring work in CC, but there are other avenues for an opportunity in place for you. One of these is known collectively as reporting services. You may already be familiar with these reports,

These services are for construction managers (CMs), general contractors (GCs), subcontractors, suppliers and anyone with a vested interest in commercial construction work. Most of these reports include pertinent details regarding the project such as a description of the work itself, the architect/engineer (A/E), the owner and even bidding companies currently holding plans. They’ll also give a bid date/time and may even tell you how to go about acquiring bidding documents (many sites even offer downloadable electronic versions).

CONSTRUCTION ORGANIZATIONS & PLAN ROOMS

Another popular avenue for exploring CC opportunities is through your local construction organization such as the AGC (Associated General Contractors) and ABC (Associated Builders & Contractors) and a host of other groups that represent a wide and varied array of sub-contractors, suppliers, support agencies and government bodies who work in the CC industry. You may already belong to one of these associations. These groups also often sponsor local and/or area plan rooms (both physical and online) where blueprints and specifications on upcoming/bidding CC projects can be viewed or (in some cases) checked out or downloaded for you to perform takeoffs and estimates. Again, some ask for a fee and others don’t.

Choose The Best Led Electrical Lighting For Your Home

Tips for Choosing LED Bulbs for Your Home

Be Careful of Using LEDs in the Garage

Note that LEDs don’t fair well in many garages. First, they can confuse older garage door openers and sensors. Second, the vibration caused by the garage door opening and closing can damage the diodes over time.

Stay Away from Extreme Temperatures

High temperatures can quickly fry an average LED bulb cluster, and freezing temps aren’t great for longevity, either. Stick to mild-temperature locations for LEDs, and use LED bulbs designed for the outdoors when necessary.

Read LED Labels

Manufactures are beginning to adopt LED-specific labels with many of the standard specifications. Compare bulbs by referring to the information on these labels.

Be Wary of Enclosed LED Bulbs

Enclosed (when you screw on a translucent covering) or recessed lighting can be dangerous for LED bulbs. LEDs only produce a small amount of heat, but they are highly susceptible to heat damage, so heat needs to be channeled away with a heat sink, a metallic base designed to conduct heat away from the sensitive parts of the LED. Enclosed bulbs can’t get rid of heat as easily, which can kill LED bulbs not designed for those situations.

Buy From a High-Quality Manufacturer

LED bulbs are famous for their long lives. In practice, they do last a long time, but not necessarily for years and years. Quality is still important, and poorly made LED lights for home will die just as soon as an incandescent bulb, if not faster. Choose high-quality, reliable manufacturers with good reviews, even if that means paying a little extra.

 

The Basics of LED Lighting

What are LEDs and how do they work?

LED stands for light emitting diode. LED lighting products produce light approximately 90% more efficiently than incandescent light bulbs. How do they work? An electrical current passes through a microchip, which illuminates the tiny light sources we call LEDs and the result is visible light. To prevent performance issues, the heat LEDs produce is absorbed into a heat sink.

Lifetime of LED Lighting Products

The useful life of LED lighting products is defined differently than that of other light sources, such as incandescent or compact fluorescent lighting (CFL). LEDs typically do not “burn out” or fail. Instead, they experience ‘lumen depreciation’, wherein the brightness of the LED dims slowly over time. Unlike incandescent bulbs, LED “lifetime” is established on a prediction of when the light output decreases by 30 percent.

How are LEDs Used in Lighting

LEDs are incorporated into bulbs and fixtures for general lighting applications. Small in size, LEDs provide unique design opportunities. Some LED bulb solutions may physically resemble familiar light bulbs and better match the appearance of traditional light bulbs. Some LED light fixtures may have LEDs built in as a permanent light source. There are also hybrid approaches where a non-traditional “bulb” or replaceable light source format is used and specially designed for a unique fixture. LEDs offer a tremendous opportunity for innovation in lighting form factors and fit a wider breadth of applications than traditional lighting technologies.

LEDs and Heat

LEDs use heat sinks to absorb the heat produced by the LED and dissipate it into the surrounding environment. This keeps LEDs from overheating and burning out. Thermal management is generally the single most important factor in the successful performance of an LED over its lifetime. The higher the temperature at which the LEDs are operated, the more quickly the light will degrade, and the shorter the useful life will be.

 

Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

Introduction

LEDs are all around us: In our phones, our cars and even our homes. Any time something electronic lights up, there’s a good chance that an LED is behind it. They come in a huge variety of sizes, shapes, and colors, but no matter what they look like they have one thing in common: they’re the bacon of electronics. They’re widely purported to make any project better and they’re often added to unlikely things (to everyone’s delight).

Unlike bacon, however, they’re no good once you’ve cooked them. This guide will help you avoid any accidental LED barbecues! First things first, though. What exactly is this LED thing everyone’s talking about?

LEDs (that’s “ell-ee-dees”) are a particular type of diode that convert electrical energy into light. In fact, LED stands for “Light Emitting Diode.” (It does what it says on the tin!) And this is reflected in the similarity between the diode and LED schematic symbols:

In short, LEDs are like tiny lightbulbs. However, LEDs require a lot less power to light up by comparison. They’re also more energy efficient, so they don’t tend to get hot like conventional lightbulbs do (unless you’re really pumping power into them). This makes them ideal for mobile devices and other low-power applications. Don’t count them out of the high-power game, though. High-intensity LEDs have found their way into accent lighting, spotlights and even automotive headlights!

Are you getting the craving yet? The craving to put LEDs on everything? Good, stick with us and we’ll show you how!

Suggested Reading

Here are some other topics that will be discussed in this tutorial. If you are unfamiliar with any of them, please have a look at the respective tutorial before you go any further.

 

Everything You Need To Know About LED Lighting

What Does LED Stand For?

A diode is an electrical device or component with two electrodes (an anode and a cathode) through which electricity flows – characteristically in only one direction (in through the anode and out through the cathode). Diodes are generally made from semi-conductive materials such as silicon or selenium – substances that conduct electricity in some circumstances and not in others (e.g. at certain voltages, current levels, or light intensities).

What is LED Lighting?

A light-emitting diode is a semiconductor device that emits visible light when an electrical current passes through it. It is essentially the opposite of a photovoltaic cell (a device that converts visible light into electrical current).

How Do LED Lights Work?

It’s really simple actually, and very cheap to produce, which is why there was so much excitement when LED lights were first invented!

The Technical Details: LED lights are composed of two types of semiconducting material (a p-type and an n-type). Both the p-type and n-type materials, also called extringent materials, have been doped (dipped into a substance called a “doping agent”) so as to slightly alter their electrical properties from their pure, unaltered, or “intrinsic” form (i-type).

Application of the Technical Details to LED Lighting:

When a light-emitting diode (LED) has a voltage source connected with the positive side on the anode and the negative side on the cathode, current will flow (and light will be emitted, a condition known as forward bias). If the positive and negative ends of the voltage source were inversely connected (positive to the cathode and negative to the anode), current would not flow (a condition known as reverse bias). Forward bias allows current to flow through the LED and in so doing, emits light. Reverse bias prevents current from flowing through the LED (at least up until a certain point where it is unable to keep the current at bay – known as the peak inverse voltage – a point that if reached, will irreversibly damage the device).

 

How To Determine How Many LED Lumens You’ll Need To Properly Light Your Space

Efficacy

The number of lumens a bulb produces for each watt it consumes. The higher the number, the more efficient the bulb. For example, lighting products that have been designated with the ENERGY STAR label are deemed high efficacy, meaning they have been determined to deliver the same features while using less energy.

The Breakdown—How Much Light is Enough?

Determine Room Square Footage. Multiply the length times the width of the room to get the room square footage. For example, if the room is 10 feet wide and 10 feet long, the room square footage will be 100 square feet.

Lumens

Lumen output, also known as brightness or light output, is a measure of the total quantity of visible emitted by a light source per unit of time, weighted according to the human eye’s sensitivity to wavelengths of light, the study of which is known as luminous efficiency function. The reference point: a standard 100-watt incandescent light bulb produces about 1,500 – 1,700 lumens.

Watts

Not a measure of brightness; instead, it’s a measure of how much electricity (or energy) a light bulb consumes to reach its claimed brightness.  Each type of light source, LED, fluorescent, halogen or incandescent has a different lumen-per-watt ratio.  Below we’re going to use lumens as a measurement to make sure we have enough light for a space.

Wattage Equivalence

Since we’ve conflated watts and lumens, it’s easier to talk about bulbs in terms of watts. So if a 100-watt incandescent produces 1,500 lumens, and a 10-watt LED does the same, the 10-Watt LED may advertise “100-watt equivalent” on its label.

Must Know A Little About Electrician

Electricians – What Their Work Includes

What is the job of most electricians? What do they do? Most people think of electricians as people that only come to your house to fix an electrical problem. Well, they do that a lot, but they also do other work that serves not only individuals but also large companies, the state, etc. Usually, the job of an electrician lasts about forty hours a week. That, however, doesn’t mean that it is fixed. Sometimes, they may work overtime. Other times, it may be necessary to supervise a certain machine for hours.

 

Work Environment

Electricians work indoors and out, at construction sites, in homes, and in businesses or factories. The work may be strenuous at times and may include bending conduit, lifting heavy objects, and standing, stooping, and kneeling for long periods. Electricians risk injury from electrical shock, falls, and cuts, and must follow strict safety procedures to avoid injuries. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show that full-time electricians experienced a work-related injury and illness rate that was higher than the national average. When working outdoors, they may be subject to inclement weather. Some electricians may have to travel long distances to jobsites.

Most electricians work a standard 40-hour week, although overtime may be required. Those who do maintenance work may work nights or weekends and be on call to go to the worksite when needed. Electricians in industrial settings may have periodic extended overtime during scheduled maintenance or retooling periods. Companies that operate 24 hours a day may employ three shifts of electricians.

 

Training

Most electricians learn their trade in a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship program. For each year of the program, apprentices must complete at least 144 hours of technical training and 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training. In the classroom, apprentices learn electrical theory, blueprint reading, mathematics, electrical code requirements, and safety and first-aid practices. They also may receive specialized training related to soldering, communications, fire alarm systems, and elevators.

After completing an apprenticeship program, electricians are considered to be journey workers and may perform duties on their own, subject to any local licensing requirements. Because of this comprehensive training, those who complete apprenticeship programs qualify to do both construction and maintenance work.

Several groups, including unions and contractor associations, sponsor apprenticeship programs. The basic qualifications to enter an apprenticeship program are as follows:

  • Minimum age of 18
  • High school education or equivalent
  • One year of algebra
  • Qualifying score on an aptitude test
  • Pass substance abuse screening

Some electrical contractors have their own training program. Although most workers enter apprenticeships directly, some electricians enter apprenticeship programs after working as a helper.

 

What Do Electricians Do

Electricians install, maintain, and repair electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures. Ensure that work is in accordance with relevant codes. May install or service street lights, intercom systems, or electrical control systems. They also plan layout and installation of electrical wiring, equipment, or fixtures, based on job specifications and local codes.

Other tasks include:

  • Connect wires to circuit breakers, transformers, or other components.
  • Test electrical systems or continuity of circuits in electrical wiring, equipment, or fixtures, using testing devices, such as ohmmeters, voltmeters, or oscilloscopes, to ensure compatibility and safety of system.
  • Use a variety of tools or equipment, such as power construction equipment, measuring devices, power tools, and testing equipment, such as oscilloscopes, ammeters, or test lamps.
  • Inspect electrical systems, equipment, or components to identify hazards, defects, or the need for adjustment or repair, and to ensure compliance with codes.
  • Prepare sketches or follow blueprints to determine the location of wiring or equipment and to ensure conformance to building and safety codes.
  • Diagnose malfunctioning systems, apparatus, or components, using test equipment and hand tools to locate the cause of a breakdown and correct the problem.

 

What Types of Electrician

Below are just a few examples of possible jobs you could take on when trained as an electrician:

  • Domestic Electrical Installers

Perhaps the most common type of electrician, domestic electrical installers work on domestic properties. So that’s small and larger jobs around the home, ranging from simple socket fixes to installation of wiring throughout a property.

  • Installation Electrician

You’ll be responsible for installing systems such as lighting, security, power, fire protection systems and structure cabling.

This job is slightly larger in scope than a domestic electrical installer’s work, as it allows the possibility of working on larger projects. Installation electricians can work anywhere ranging from construction sites to commercial properties.

  • Maintenance Electrician

Maintenance electricians ensure that modern electrical systems and the equipment that they serve are always running effectively, safely and efficiently.

This can involve anything from maintaining the power grid to fixing problems with machinery within factories.

  • Electrotechnical Panel Builder

They use programmable logic controllers and information technology to build and manage the electrical control panels that control buildings heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment.

  • Instrumentation Electrician

This job involves commissioning, testing, fault finding and the repairing of building environmental control systems, such as large air conditioning units, heating and refrigeration.

  • Electrical Machine Repairer & Rewinder

Skilled electrical machine repair and rewind specialists are required to repair and maintain equipment machinery such as transformers, compressors, pumps and fans within buildings.

  • Highway Electrical Systems Electrician

Trained highway electrical systems electricians ensure that our street lighting, including traffic management systems are continuously managed and maintained to a high standard.